Haunting photos of polar ice
極地の氷を追い続けて

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It is not a death when they melt, it is not an end, but a continuation of their path through the cycle of life.

氷山は、解けてしまっても、それで終わりじゃない。生命のサイクルは続き、つながっていきます。

プロフィール

カミール・シーマン
写真家

1969年、アメリカ・ニューヨーク州生まれ。ニューヨーク州立大学で写真術を学び、1992年に卒業。作品は、ナショナルジオグラフィックなど数々の雑誌へ掲載されている。これまでに、National Geographic AwardやCritical Mass Top Monograph Awardを受賞。写真集にMelting Away(2014)がある。
【吹き替え】田村聖子

プレゼンテーション英文

Camille Seaman: Haunting photos of polar ice As an artist, connection is very important to me. Through my work, I’m trying to articulate that humans are not separate from nature and that everything is interconnected. I first went to Antarctica almost 10 years ago, where I saw my first icebergs. I was in awe. My heart beat fast. My head was dizzy, trying to comprehend what it was that stood in front o...

Superview vol.139

秘境を旅することの功罪

Sputniko!: カミール・シーマンの写真、すごくきれいでした。彼女は実際にああいう風景を見たんだな、と思うとドキドキします。もしあれを自分の目で見たら、氷山の減少のような環境問題について、きっと身近に感じると思います。

Joi: 最近、エコツーリズムの一環で、秘境を旅する人が増えています。それに対していろいろな意見があって、たとえば南極に水や燃料や食料を持って行くには大きなコストがかかるし、それは温室効果ガスの排出につながります。そうした行動は環境への関心を高める効果がある一方、環境に悪いわけですから、バランスを考える必要があると思います。


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同時放送のクリス・バーカード「凍りつく海でのサーフィンは最高!/The joy of surfing in ice-cold water」はこちら

 

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Camille Seaman: Haunting photos of polar ice

As an artist, connection is very important to me. Through my work, I’m trying to articulate that humans are not separate from nature and that everything is interconnected.

I first went to Antarctica almost 10 years ago, where I saw my first icebergs. I was in awe. My heart beat fast. My head was dizzy, trying to comprehend what it was that stood in front of me. The icebergs around me were almost 200 feet out of the water. And I could only help but wonder that this was one snowflake on top of another snowflake, year after year.

Icebergs are born when they calve off of glaciers or break off of ice shelves. Each iceberg has its own individual personality. They have a distinct way of interacting with their environment and their experiences. Some refuse to give up and hold on to the bitter end, while others can’t take it anymore and crumble in a fit of dramatic passion.

It’s easy to think, when you look at an iceberg, that they’re isolated, that they’re separate and alone, much like we as humans sometimes view ourselves. But the reality is far from it. As an iceberg melts, I am breathing in its ancient atmosphere. As the iceberg melts, it is releasing mineral-rich fresh water that nourishes many forms of life.

I approach photographing these icebergs as if I’m making portraits of my ancestors, knowing that in these individual moments they exist in that way and will never exist that way again. It is not a death when they melt, it is not an end, but a continuation of their path through the cycle of life.

Some of the ice in the icebergs that I photograph is very young – a couple thousand years old. And some of the ice is over 100,000 years old.

The last pictures I’d like to show you are of an iceberg that I photographed in Qeqertarsuaq, Greenland. It’s a very rare occasion that you get to actually witness an iceberg rolling. So here it is. You can see on the left side a small boat. That’s about a 15-foot boat. And I’d like you to pay attention to the shape of the iceberg and where it is at the waterline. You can see here, it begins to roll, and the boat has moved to the other side, and the man is standing there. This is an average-sized Greenlandic iceberg. It’s about 120 feet above the water, or 40 meters. And this video is real time.

And just like that, the iceberg shows you a different side of its personality.

Thank you.

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