Home/Tomorrow
Tomorrow Logo
The third season of TOMORROW documents the lessons and wisdom gained through enduring the March 2011 disaster. Covering the fields of disaster prevention, environmental well-being, psychological care, and new technology, we share our findings with the world.
The series runs on:
NHK WORLD TVMon.01:30, 07:30, 13:30, 19:30 (UTC)
NHK WORLD PremiumWed. of next week17:00 (UTC)
NHK BS1
(Bilingual broadcast)
Wed.14:00 (JST)
 Sun.04:00 (JST)
 

Dec 24

(Wed. 1:30/7:30/13:30/19:30 UTC)

Convenience Stores in the Disaster Areas Rerun

Many convenience stores in the Tohoku region suffered damage and casualties at the time of the 3.11 disaster. However, those that reopened shortly after played an important role as a lifeline for people in the stricken areas, selling food and carrying out administrative activities. Japan’s unique convenience stores, renowned for their careful and versatile service have evolved further since the disaster. They are now perfecting disaster prevention manuals, installing earthquake and tsunami alarms, and storing food, fuel, and backup resources in cooperation with local governments. Daniel Kahl reports on the way convenience stores are preparing themselves to be ‘disaster stations’ supporting the local community.

NHK World Viewers' Choice Awards 2014
Dec 29 (Mon.)
Forest-powered Recovery 1

Forest-powered Recovery 1 Rerun

The 2011 tsunami caused serious damage to Iwate’s forestry industry. The Kamaishi Local Forestry Association was in danger of closing down. Its office had been washed away, its leader and four other members had perished, and the coastal plywood factory had been badly damaged. Hoping to save the association, secretary Yukio Takahashi started a project to promote ‘local construction with local materials’. It now works with local wood-processing firms, design offices, and building contractors to construct quality houses at a cost of 10 million yen each for disaster victims using local timber. In this two-part series, we see how Takahashi overcame many problems to work on Kamaishi’s recovery by harnessing the power of wood while considering the establishment of sustainable forestry.

 
Jan 5 (Mon.)
Forest-powered Recovery 2

Forest-powered Recovery 2 Rerun

The 2011 tsunami caused serious damage to Iwate’s forestry industry. The Kamaishi Local Forestry Association was in danger of closing down. Its office had been washed away, its leader and four other members had perished, and the coastal plywood factory had been badly damaged. Hoping to save the association, secretary Yukio Takahashi started a project to promote ‘local construction with local materials’. It now works with local wood-processing firms, design offices, and building contractors to construct quality houses at a cost of 10 million yen each for disaster victims using local timber. In this two-part series, we see how Takahashi overcame many problems to work on Kamaishi’s recovery by harnessing the power of wood while considering the establishment of sustainable forestry.

 
 
 
Whos been on TOMORROW
Dec 15
Foreign Evacuees in Japan

Foreign Evacuees in Japan

At an unusual evacuation site in the Sanjo district of Sendai, more than half of the 1,000 evacuees were foreigners. This happened because many overseas students lived in the area and widely circulated e-mails reported that the Sanjo evacuation site was safe. However, the foreigners who escaped there were soon at a loss. Few of the Japanese evacuees could speak English and they were unable to explain the rules of the site well. Cultural and behavior differences stood out in relief and led to friction. Since then, the Sanjo district has been trying to make improvements in various ways based on the lessons learned. It has produced a disaster prevention manual in 10 languages and established a disaster prevention leader system so that foreigners who are fluent in Japanese can become evacuation guidance leaders. They’re also trying to share disaster awareness and cross-cultural understanding by holding regular discussion sessions on how local residents and foreigners can cooperate. There will be more and more foreign residents in Japan in the future. The program presents hints on surviving disasters through mutual assistance.

 
Dec 8
Soak for the Soul: Mobile Baths for Evacuees

Soak for the Soul: Mobile Baths for Evacuees

The Japan Self-Defense Forces have carried out a variety of lifesaving and support activities since the 3.11 disaster. Not many people know that they provided bathing facilities for people who were experiencing a protracted evacuee life. Bathing not only improves people’s sanitary condition but also helps to heal their mind. The JSDF set up its temporary bathing equipment called ‘Field Bathing Set Mk.2’ at 42 different locations. A tank car pumps up water from the river, filters it, and then heats it for 45 minutes to provide 5.4 tons of hot water per hour. It allows 30 people to shower at the same time and 1,200 people to take a bath per day. The baths had a great healing effect on those forced to escape from the tsunami and the nuclear accident with just the clothes they were wearing. This mobile bathing service is unique to Japan with its traditional bathing culture.

 
Dec 1
Elderly People Back on Their Feet

Elderly People Back on Their Feet

Many of the elderly people forced to live as an evacuee or in temporary housing ever since the 3.11 disaster lead inactive lives with nothing special to do. This can result in hypofunction of the whole body, making them susceptible to ‘disuse syndrome’. Dr. Yayoi Okawa identified many such cases after the 2007 Chuetsu Offshore Earthquake, and since then she has been supporting sufferers in various ways. The program interviews people who have managed to overcome the syndrome by getting involved in the revival of tangle-net fishing and seaweed farming, which has reenergized them and rejuvenated their sense of confidence. It also looks at ways to avoid the syndrome and how it can be treated with the support of families and friends.

 
 
 
Nov 17
Clearing Roads for Rescue!

Clearing Roads for Rescue!

Miyako, Iwate Prefecture, is an important crossroads where Routes 106 from Morioka and the coastal 45 meet. Local construction workers took just two days to clear the roads of tsunami debris: first opening up the area within 800 yards of the junction, and then the route south to Yamada-machi. Bonnie Waycott reports on the men who overcame many difficulties in the chaos right after the disaster, including seismic wave warnings and a lack of communication means, fuel and food.

 
Nov 3
Forest-powered Recovery 2

Forest-powered Recovery 2

The 2011 tsunami caused serious damage to Iwate’s forestry industry. The Kamaishi Local Forestry Association was in danger of closing down. Its office had been washed away, its leader and four other members had perished, and the coastal plywood factory had been badly damaged. Hoping to save the association, secretary Yukio Takahashi started a project to promote ‘local construction with local materials’. It now works with local wood-processing firms, design offices, and building contractors to construct quality houses at a cost of 10 million yen each for disaster victims using local timber. In this two-part series, we see how Takahashi overcame many problems to work on Kamaishi’s recovery by harnessing the power of wood while considering the establishment of sustainable forestry.

 
Oct 27
Forest-powered Recovery 1

Forest-powered Recovery 1

The 2011 tsunami caused serious damage to Iwate’s forestry industry. The Kamaishi Local Forestry Association was in danger of closing down. Its office had been washed away, its leader and four other members had perished, and the coastal plywood factory had been badly damaged. Hoping to save the association, secretary Yukio Takahashi started a project to promote ‘local construction with local materials’. It now works with local wood-processing firms, design offices, and building contractors to construct quality houses at a cost of 10 million yen each for disaster victims using local timber. In this two-part series, we see how Takahashi overcame many problems to work on Kamaishi’s recovery by harnessing the power of wood while considering the establishment of sustainable forestry.

 
 
 
Oct 13
Tohoku Teenagers Bloom in Paris

Tohoku Teenagers Bloom in Paris

The opening of the OECD Tohoku School in March 2012 launched a 30-month project in which 100 teenagers from three disaster-stricken Tohoku prefectures would think up ways to promote their regions at a presentation in France in summer 2014. Although many of the students had lost relatives in the disaster and still live at evacuation sites, they put great effort into planning ideas and promoting them, and the Paris event was a great success. Focusing on students from Okuma-machi, Fukushima prefecture, and Otsuchi-cho, Iwate prefecture, preparing photo exhibits, the program shows how children from the stricken areas have matured through the school’s activities.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apr 28
The Magical Power of Cinema

The Magical Power of Cinema

Movies have provided great support to people in the Tohoku region. From two months after the disaster, the “Cinema Yell Tohoku” project has held more than 500 free-of-charge screenings of popular movies in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures. With the help of people in the movie industry, screenings have been held at elementary schools and temporary housing complexes. People are once again enjoying watching movies together with others, and movies are starting to become a new focus for community-building. The program investigates the spirit of people connected by movies and the regeneration of communities.

 
 
 
Previous season Previous season
 
 
Privacy PolicyAbout this site
Corporate InfoAbout NHK|Press Releases|50 Years of NHK TelevisionCopyright NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) All rights reserved.