Home/Tomorrow
Tomorrow Logo
The TV series TOMORROW documents the lessons and wisdom gained through enduring the March 2011 disaster. Covering the fields of disaster prevention, environmental well-being, psychological care, and new technology, we share our findings with the world.
The series runs on:
NHK WORLD TVMon.01:30, 07:30, 10:30, 19:30 (UTC)
NHK WORLD PremiumWed. of next week17:00 (UTC)
NHK BS1
(Bilingual broadcast)
Wed.14:00 (JST)
 Sun.04:00 (JST)
 

Aug 31

The Power of Radio Rerun

Immediately after the Great East Japan Earthquake, two Tohoku radio stations were suddenly unable to receive accurate local information, and the tsunami and nuclear accident occurred shortly afterwards. However, “Radio Fukushima”, which covers the whole of Fukushima Prefecture, and “TBC Radio”, which has a network right across Miyagi Prefecture, continued broadcasting. They used every possible means, including outside broadcast vans and the Internet. How did they handle the information they asked their listeners to send in? TV producer Russell Goodall from New Zealand visits those who were involved to report on that time when a relationship of great trust developed between the radio stations and their listeners.

Sep 7
Memories of 3.11 Shown in Story Cards

Memories of 3.11 Shown in Story Cards

In the belief that memories of the 3.11 disaster should be handed down to posterity, more than 100 stories have been produced for ‘kami shibai’, public storytelling with pictures. Many of them are based on actual events in Fukushima Prefecture at the time of the earthquake. They cover a wide range of topics, including the story of a boy who saved many local residents from the tsunami and the experiences of people forced to evacuate after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. American Jason Hancock reports on the true stories behind the storytelling.

 
Sep 14
A Tradition of Restoration

A Tradition of Restoration Rerun

The Great East Japan Earthquake damaged many cultural assets, such as temples, shrines, and statues of Buddha. Since ancient times most Japanese buildings and statues have been created from the country’s rich sources of timber, including Horyuji Temple, the world’s oldest wooden building. It’s very important to preserve such treasures that have witnessed the nation’s history, but how has that been possible in the face of so many natural disasters? The answer lies in the restoration skills that have been handed down from generation to generation. This edition of TOMORROW focuses on Japan’s expertise in post-disaster restoration work.

 
 
 
Whos been on TOMORROW
Jul 13
A Tradition of Restoration

A Tradition of Restoration

The Great East Japan Earthquake damaged many cultural assets, such as temples, shrines, and statues of Buddha. Since ancient times most Japanese buildings and statues have been created from the country’s rich sources of timber, including Horyuji Temple, the world’s oldest wooden building. It’s very important to preserve such treasures that have witnessed the nation’s history, but how has that been possible in the face of so many natural disasters? The answer lies in the restoration skills that have been handed down from generation to generation. This edition of TOMORROW focuses on Japan’s expertise in post-disaster restoration work.

 
Jun 8
The Power of Radio

The Power of Radio

Immediately after the Great East Japan Earthquake, two Tohoku radio stations were suddenly unable to receive accurate local information, and the tsunami and nuclear accident occurred shortly afterwards. However, “Radio Fukushima”, which covers the whole of Fukushima Prefecture, and “TBC Radio”, which has a network right across Miyagi Prefecture, continued broadcasting. They used every possible means, including outside broadcast vans and the Internet. How did they handle the information they asked their listeners to send in? TV producer Russell Goodall from New Zealand visits those who were involved to report on that time when a relationship of great trust developed between the radio stations and their listeners.

 
May 11
An Isolated Village That Survived Disaster

An Isolated Village That Survived Disaster

Some communities were isolated after the Great East Japan Earthquake because the roads had become impassable. Half of the homes of the Nagahora community in Rikuzentakata in Iwate Prefecture were washed away by the tsunami, but the residents evacuated to private houses on the hillside. The tsunami had destroyed the road, so there was no access. With no idea of when they would receive help, they decided to do their best to manage by themselves for at least one month. They weathered the crisis by creating 10 groups, each given a different role to perform. What made this possible was community power, a phenomenon that is now once again receiving a lot of attention. The program reports on the way a community can be created in urban areas and high-rise apartment blocks that tend to lack a community spirit.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apr 28
The Magical Power of Cinema

The Magical Power of Cinema

Movies have provided great support to people in the Tohoku region. From two months after the disaster, the “Cinema Yell Tohoku” project has held more than 500 free-of-charge screenings of popular movies in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures. With the help of people in the movie industry, screenings have been held at elementary schools and temporary housing complexes. People are once again enjoying watching movies together with others, and movies are starting to become a new focus for community-building. The program investigates the spirit of people connected by movies and the regeneration of communities.

 
 
 
 
 
Previous season Previous season
 
 
Privacy PolicyAbout this site
Corporate InfoAbout NHK|Press Releases|50 Years of NHK TelevisionCopyright NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) All rights reserved.