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The third season of TOMORROW documents the lessons and wisdom gained through enduring the March 2011 disaster. Covering the fields of disaster prevention, environmental well-being, psychological care, and new technology, we share our findings with the world.
The series runs on:
NHK WORLD TVMon.01:30, 07:30, 13:30, 19:30 (UTC)
NHK WORLD PremiumWed. of next week17:00 (UTC)
NHK BS1
(Japanese language only)
Wed.14:00 (JST)
 Sun.04:00 (JST)

Oct 6

Pharmacists' Innovative Approach

After the tsunami had washed away most patient’s prescriptions, pharmacists in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, received special permission to distribute the stocks left at pharmacies, especially drugs for evacuees with chronic diseases. Confusion was avoided through the cooperation of various pharmacies. They also helped sort out the chaos at evacuation centers in Otsuchi by gathering prescriptions every day and delivering the drugs the following day. This reduced the waiting time for treatment and medicine preparation, and also facilitated inventory control. The program reviews the vital support role of pharmacists at the time of a major disaster.

 
Oct 13
Tohoku Teenagers Bloom in Paris

Tohoku Teenagers Bloom in Paris

The opening of the OECD Tohoku School in March 2012 launched a 30-month project in which 100 teenagers from three disaster-stricken Tohoku prefectures would think up ways to promote their regions at a presentation in France in summer 2014. Although many of the students had lost relatives in the disaster and still live at evacuation sites, they put great effort into planning ideas and promoting them, and the Paris event was a great success. Focusing on a girl from Iwaki hoping to plant cherry trees in Paris and students from Okuma-machi and Otsuchi-cho preparing photo exhibits, the program shows how children from the stricken areas have matured through the school’s activities.

 
Oct 20
Convenience Stores in the Disaster Areas

Convenience Stores in the Disaster Areas (rerun)

Many convenience stores in the Tohoku region suffered damage and casualties at the time of the 3.11 disaster. However, those that reopened shortly after played an important role as a lifeline for people in the stricken areas, selling food and carrying out administrative activities. Japan’s unique convenience stores, renowned for their careful and versatile service have evolved further since the disaster. They are now perfecting disaster prevention manuals, installing earthquake and tsunami alarms, and storing food, fuel, and backup resources in cooperation with local governments. Daniel Kahl reports on the way convenience stores are preparing themselves to be ‘disaster stations’ supporting the local community.

 
 
 
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Sep 29
Convenience Stores in the Disaster Areas

Convenience Stores in the Disaster Areas

Many convenience stores in the Tohoku region suffered damage and casualties at the time of the 3.11 disaster. However, those that reopened shortly after played an important role as a lifeline for people in the stricken areas, selling food and carrying out administrative activities. Japan’s unique convenience stores, renowned for their careful and versatile service have evolved further since the disaster. They are now perfecting disaster prevention manuals, installing earthquake and tsunami alarms, and storing food, fuel, and backup resources in cooperation with local governments. Daniel Kahl reports on the way convenience stores are preparing themselves to be ‘disaster stations’ supporting the local community.

 
Sep 8
Corporate Volunteers in the Disaster Zone

Corporate Volunteers in the Disaster Zone

In the fourth year since the 3.11 earthquake, the number of volunteers to the Tohoku region is rapidly decreasing. At the same time, there’s a change in the corporate volunteerism that has continued since right after the disaster, with a growing focus on corporate specialization to meet actual needs. For example, Ajinomoto provides cooking classes at temporary housing sites, and Fuji Xerox now includes document cleaning as part of staff training, has cleaned and digitized 4,500 official documents, and has developed a system for clinics to check medical records on tablet terminals. The program investigates sustainable support using corporate specialization.

 
Aug 25
Radio Taxis in Support of Fire Brigades

Radio Taxis in Support of Fire Brigades

The firemen of Kesennuma City in Miyagi Prefecture faced serious problems when the Great East Japan Earthquake cut off communication tools, including mobile phones. They couldn’t transmit on-site reports because their radios functioned only for reception. Local taxi drivers came to their rescue with their analog radios, providing support at the disaster HQ, evacuation sites and mortuaries. Learning from this, Kesennuma has been developing a multiplex information communication system. The program looks at ways to improve communications when a disaster strikes.

 
 
 
Aug 18
Recovering Ocean: The Sanriku Coast
 
Jul 28
The Mystery of the Pneumonia Epidemic
 
Jul 7
The Neighboring Town that Welcomed 100,000 Volunteers
 
 
 
Jun 23
Taking on the Mountain of Aid
 
Jun 16
How to Protect Children's Lives
 
Jun 9
Accepting and Telling the Stories about the Disaster
 
 
 
May 19
The Nursing Home that Saved 1,000 Lives
 
Apr 28
The Magical Power of Cinema

The Magical Power of Cinema

Movies have provided great support to people in the Tohoku region. From two months after the disaster, the “Cinema Yell Tohoku” project has held more than 500 free-of-charge screenings of popular movies in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures. With the help of people in the movie industry, screenings have been held at elementary schools and temporary housing complexes. People are once again enjoying watching movies together with others, and movies are starting to become a new focus for community-building. The program investigates the spirit of people connected by movies and the regeneration of communities.

 
Apr 14
Disaster Medicine Direct
 
 
 
Apr 28
The Magical Power of Cinema

The Magical Power of Cinema

Movies have provided great support to people in the Tohoku region. From two months after the disaster, the “Cinema Yell Tohoku” project has held more than 500 free-of-charge screenings of popular movies in Iwate, Miyagi and Fukushima prefectures. With the help of people in the movie industry, screenings have been held at elementary schools and temporary housing complexes. People are once again enjoying watching movies together with others, and movies are starting to become a new focus for community-building. The program investigates the spirit of people connected by movies and the regeneration of communities.

 
Apr 14
Disaster Medicine Direct
 
Mar 31
Save Lives! Citizens Stand Up to Tsunami
 
 
 
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